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Wednesday, March 9

 

Monday Morning Quarterbacking

With three seconds left in the Oklahoma State game and Texas ahead by three points, Rick Barnes decided to have his team foul the Oklahoma State player on the floor, to prevent any chance at a three point attempt. As we all know, the strategy backfired, as Brad Buckman managed to grab the arm of the Oklahoma State player just as he began to fire his desperation heave.

We want to know what you think. Does it make sense to foul a player on the floor to prevent a three point attempt or are you better off defending and hoping for a miss? Is the risk of what happened to Texas worth the potential benefit of preventing the opposition form an attempt to tie the game? Please join in with your thoughts.
--PB--

Comments:
Since I don't get many TX games up in Beantown, I watch them whenever they're on. I would agree w/ Barnes that you should foul in the situation TX was in. I also think that the ref made a terrible call, as it was clear that he fouled before the guy tried to shoot. But, I guess that's the risk you take. I suppose you also risk a steal on the inbounds pass. That's my two cents. Good call by Barnes, poor call by the ref.

Hope everything is good in Austin!!
 
Good Decision, Bad Coaching

From what I heard after the game on T.V., which may have just been the announcers talking, was that Barnes told his guys to foul any OSU player who got the ball after they took one dribble. What's the point in that? I do agree that fouling was the best choice. The chance of an OSU player missing the second free throw, and them trying for a tip in, is about as good if not less than a midcourt 3. With Klotts, and Buckman on the blocks, that option was the best one. I think that Barnes made the right decision, but if he told his guys to foul after one dribble, maybe his directions were a little off.

NEWBS
 
I'm torn on this coaching decision. On the one hand, I understand the logic of limiting them to free throws and tip in opportunities. But it just seems to invite disaster. The worst that happens if you don't foul is they make a miraculous three point attempt as time expires and we go to overtime.

But if you foul, you invite all kinds of disaster scenarios, including the one we got, where they get three free throw attempts to tie it. Worse, they could make the first free throw, get a rebound off a miss and put it in. It happens all the time. And that's not to mention the potential foul on the rebound or putback.

I'm in favor of trying to keep them from advancing quickly up the court, but making them hit the tough three to win.
--PB--
 
I am going to have to disagree with Bean on this one. I like the strategy of fouling only in certain situations, and the Ok State situation was perfect: up three points, a full length inbounds play, and less than four seconds left. Other situations like a sideline out of bounds play or more time on the clock do not warant the intentional foul. Fouling on the floor doesn't even allow the opportunity to score three points. Even though a half court shot is a prayer, there is still the chance that it goes in. As far as being worried about making the first and tipping in the second, that is a justified concern. But it is not one that is very likely. More often the defensive team will secure the rebound or the shooting team will be called for over the back. I applauded Barnes on Saturday and hope he uses a similar strategy in the future.

-AW-
 
I know it is Thursday and the column is called Monday morning QB, but I have been stuck in Rochester in the coldest weather I have ever felt without a constant internet connection, and anyway, I cant help myself when I get a change to post something on the internet, especially on a blog with such a huge fan base.
The call was the right one, but you have to know how to commit a foul. If Buckman had fouled hard enough to make sure that there was no way to even attempt to get a shot off we would not be having this heated discussion. Without getting the intentional foul, you have to control the guy's arms so they can’t even move toward the basket.
 
Finally, the rocket scientist chimes in to explain the physics of a foul.
 
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